Co-parenting is the most common form of child custody division after a divorce. There are many reasons for this, including that, statistically, co-parenting is in the best interest of the child. 
 
However, even though there are serious benefits for children, co-parenting can be difficult on the parents. According to Healthline, the first step toward healthy co-parenting is letting go of the past. 
 
How can I move forward? 
 
When you finalize the divorce, the relationship with your ex-spouse has changed forever. It is natural for you to have a modicum of hard feelings against your ex-spouse; after all, it is likely that hard feelings led to your divorce in the first place. 
 
However, you still brought one or multiple lives into the world with this person, and you have a duty to those children. Shifting your relationship from the romantic relationship it once was to the parenting relationship it now is can be difficult. A good tip is to have a strong support system. This may include family, friends or professional therapists. You need people to support you and to vent with, but make sure to never do this with your children. 
 
How can I create a good co-parenting situation? 
 
Strong communication is necessary. However, strong communication does not need to be heartfelt. You are under no obligations to actually like your ex-spouse or enjoy spending time with him or her. It is necessary to remain clear and respectful. You may find communicating by text is the most efficient way to do this. Plus, having an email or a text message with agreed-upon information means that nobody can “forget” the way they might if conversations happen face-to-face. 

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